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Righting Line  Bottom

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  • I had been debating this for awhile. Thanks everyone, for weighing in.

    The Prindle manual sez the righting line is to be tied off thru a tramp grommet (with a figure 8 knot). No mention of the DS. Didn't seem right to me that a rusty old grommet and some thin webbing would be secure enough for multiple capsizes. (Picture ripping the tramp a new one and watching the boat float away with the rope still in your hands).

    On the Prindles, the mast ball sits right at the casting, so any righting or anchor lines wrapped here could get under the mast and lead to a dismast. I'm not too fond of those events.

    So I currently have 2 righting lines stuffed, both tied to the DS. Plus a Hawaiian system, plus a righting bag. (No room for an anchor yet, but I'm working on it).

    Guess I'll tie the primary righting line through the grommet and to the DS, and give that a try.

    And try REAL HARD not to flip it.

    --
    Prindle 18
    96734
    --
  • Quote I see the mast is still pinned to the ball. He would remove that pin before sailing.

    Why? it's a captive ball - no need to remove it is there?

    also - his boards are down - pretty sure this was already "sailing"
  • Wow, a lot posted here from a single picture, very entertaining. I was actually reading these posts from email notification (no pics) and never realized everyone was talking about my boat until I saw my name and went to the website. The theories and real experiences described by dogboy, Bob, Edchris, and Ron are all valid, real life experiences and certainly possible. Edchris and Ron both make excellent and accurate posts and their experience with Nacras should be respected. Butt, . . . most of these theories don't apply here.

    There is no way I would not notice or I would cause a bent, rotated loose front beam assembly. I'm too detailed, so here we go.

    Beam assembly and all parts were replaced and beam bedded January 2005, a month before picture was taken.

    https://www.thebeachcats.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=128553&g2_serialNumber=3

    The dolphin striker aluminum V-bar was also replaced and newer SS welded bolt plates were added that attach the V-bar to the beam. New internal beam castings were included and installed (old ones had some corrosion, pitting). The beam was prepped and drilled at the factory to receive hardware. Additionally, we also added structural beam reinforcement sleeves which are about 2' long. The structural sleeves made for a very tight fit for the internal beam casting. There was no rotation play possible. The setup and prep also was designed for a newer sail plan which added some rake for proper compression load alignment. (Good job Ed who said "...Or maybe he was raking the mast, & so purposefully rotated the beam a bit so that the mast was in line with the DS..."). Prebend was set a 3/8".

    So when I looked at the picture everyone was talking about it did seem to "look" rotated more forward than I can assure you it was. I think this was the result of a couple of things. The position of very aggressively forward raked mast in rotation and something called barrel distortion in wide lens photography, creating a sense of optical illusion for the viewer. Here is another picture of the exact same setup.

    https://www.thebeachcats.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=29637&g2_serialNumber=4

    This picture was taken before we went out. We rigged the platform with an aggressive forward raked mast for a light air day. You can see that the beam assembly doesn't seem to look as forward as in the picture of discussion. It is in proper intended alignment.

    Brad from Canada was my guest this particular weekend. We met because of Beachcats.com.

    --
    Philip
    --
  • nohuhuDidn't seem right to me that a rusty old grommet and some thin webbing would be secure enough for multiple capsizes. (Picture ripping the tramp a new one and watching the boat float away with the rope still in your hands).

    If that grommet is present, the tramp maker made it strong= toothed grommet and strong fabric backup. It was a standard on Prindles for nearly four decades without a recall for failure. The rest of the tramp will fail before that grommet will.

    --
    Sheet In!
    Bob
    Prindle 18-2 #244 "Wakizashi"
    Prindle 16 #3690 "Pegasus" Sold (sigh)
    AZ Multihull Fleet 42 member
    (Way) Past Commodore of Prindle Fleet 14
    Arizona, USA
    --
  • Had my righting line on prior Prindle 18 through grommet with figure eight knot on original Prindle tramp and then on Slo tramp. Use for eight years this way and never had any problems. Righted boat numerous times with and without crew on righting line without any problems. No sign of stress or tear around grommet that righting line was through. I agree that I would not tie righting line to dolphin striker.

    --
    Scott
    ARC 21
    Prindle 18
    Annapolis, Maryland
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  • spoultonHad my righting line on prior Prindle 18 through grommet with figure eight knot on original Prindle tramp and then on Slo tramp. Use for eight years this way and never had any problems. Righted boat numerous times with and without crew on righting line without any problems. No sign of stress or tear around grommet that righting line was through. I agree that I would not tie righting line to dolphin striker.

    Any righting advice for this boat Scott? Only flipped it once and it gave us a hard time, putting her into the 20mph wind. Haven't had issues with other big boats. Plus, my hulls are super slick. icon_biggrin

    --
    Prindle 18
    96734
    --
  • For those concerned about bending the ds rod, you may just tie the loop up with a lanyard, for peace of mind.
  • For my righting line, I took each end and tied it off to the front hull posts and ran the slack down the middle of my tramp lacing. If I go over I just pull it out of the lacing flip it over the hull and lean out makes a nice loop to hold onto also.

    --
    Tim geyer
    1980 hobie 16 "last chance"
    Fairview heights IL
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  • Quote nohhu Any righting advice for this boat Scott? Only flipped it once and it gave us a hard time, putting her into the 20mph wind. Haven't had issues with other big boats. Plus, my hulls are super slick.

    First I would make sure that any rivets or screws on the mast area sealed (I used a clear silicone sealant on all of these). Any water in the mast will make it near impossible to right. I un-cleat main (travler and sheet) and jib and use righting line with figure eight knots tied at intervals for better grip (although agree that loop for trap harness placed at correct height on righting line would be better option). I am 240 lbs and in this situation that is a good thing. Once the boat is on its way over, I swim under and grab dolphin striker to prevent boat from flipping to opposite side.



    Edited by spoulton on Aug 14, 2017 - 05:41 PM.

    --
    Scott
    ARC 21
    Prindle 18
    Annapolis, Maryland
    --
  • Flyinghobiefun, your idea of a righting line appeals to me. If I'm understanding it correctly, you have two lines to hang onto (even though it is a single piece of rope). Since I use a righting pole, balance at times is challenging. Having my hands spread apart would help considerably. For me, I just have a hard time picturing things from written descriptions. It would really be helpful if you could post a diagram or photo. Thanks.
  • MN3, in your July 24th post you mention carrying an anchor to use when things haven't gone real well. I like you idea, but the only thing is where the dickens do you stow and secure an anchor on a H 16. Thanks.
  • A sea anchor would probably be equally effective at holding the boat head-to-wind and could be stored in a small pouch under the tramp with much reduced risk of causing damage or injury as compared to a steel anchor.

    sm
  • catman42MN3, in your July 24th post you mention carrying an anchor to use when things haven't gone real well. I like you idea, but the only thing is where the dickens do you stow and secure an anchor on a H 16. Thanks.

    yes that can be a little bit of an issue but can easily be overcome
    I currently carry a #7 alum fortress anchor - they are not cheap but work great (in my conditions) and very light weight

    when i had hobie's i would attach a small (but hearty) bag to a tiedown spot (i think i used a hiking strap) stick the anchor and bunch of the line in there when stowed. the bag didn't need to be zipped up. this completely "hid" all the sharp corners and was very accessible

    a lot of the guys around here stick the "prongs" into their tramp pocket and let the rest of the anchor hang out
    i don't care for this because it eventually stretches/rips a little
  • Catman42 easiest way to think of it is as a Y the top is attached to the posts then I pull it forward to find the middle of the rope then feed it in between my laces on my tramp completing the Y. The laces on a hobie 16 are like a oval and go over and under with space between then that's where I feed it through. If I ever figure out how to upload photos from my phone to the website I could show you. Maybe pm me and I can send it to you in a text or email

    --
    Tim geyer
    1980 hobie 16 "last chance"
    Fairview heights IL
    --

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