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Hobie Getaway submarining  Bottom

  • We sailed a Hobie 18 for years (and a 16 before that), primarily on Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, which frequently gets 15-20 knot thermal breezes from the SW that kick up decent sized rollers coming up the length of the bay. With the 18, and even with the 16, we never submarined when on a downwind course. This is our third full season with a Getaway (we had to retire the 18 and wanted lower maintenance), and things have generally been OK, but earlier this week we were between a run and a broad reach in some of these rolling swells, and to our amazement, we watched as both hulls dove into a wave and submerged all the way to the forward crossbar. Fortunately, they popped out again and we kept going. I was just curious as to whether this is a known issue with Getaways. Of course, the shorter hull length compared to the 18 must contribute.
  • I am not a getaway sailor, but would think the front tramp could help the nose dive the bow. I know it is mesh, but still likely adds resistance to popping back up.

    --
    Scott,
    ‘92 H18 w/SX wings
    ‘95 Hobie Funseeker 12 (Holder 12)
    --
  • The Getaway main has a ton of roach and pushes what I would consider a squaretop main vs the pin top you're likely used to given your previous experience with the 16 and 18.
    You may just have the main eased too much twisting off the top and the wind will take and leverage the top of the main and drive your bows down.

    --
    Joshua

    Texas Gulf Coast
    '82 Prindle 16 (Badfish)
    '02 Hobie Wave (Unnamed Project)
    ‘87 Hobie 18 (Sold)
    ‘89 Hobie 17 (ill-advised project boat, Sold)
    --
  • I sort of forgot about this post until a couple of days ago, when it happened again. We were cruising along on a broad reach, wind picking up nicely, and a power boat was coming along to starboard. As is usually the case, the idiot driver didn't alter course or speed (never will they throttle down!!) but crossed in front of us at a good clip. We went into the oncoming wake, up and over the first big wave with no problem. As we caught up with the other side of the wake, we went nicely over the first wave, then down into the trough and the boat -- both hulls again -- dove into the next wave, bringing us almost to a stop before popping up again. So, aside from our being too cavalier and not bearing off or spilling wind, is there, maybe, a mast rake issue with the Getaway that I don't know about? If the mast is raked back more, would it keep the bows up at a time like this?
  • A few thoughts...we have a getaway (2019) with the new style bow, so may be apples/oranges.
    1) Our mast is now raked to near maximum..after early runs had a similar sensation. One hole remains on shroud connector.
    2) I think badfish has a point with the sail shape, so now am more conscious to flatten it out a bit more, added a 3:1 purchase for downhaul also
    3) The boat is incredibly forgiving. a couple weeks ago took it out in winds gusting low/mid 20s. Tried and tried to make it pitch pole. It did not want to go. We drove/dug the leeward hull soo deep, and it would then recover. We finally got it to go, but really had to force it. Such a forgiving boat.
    -Robert

    --
    Robert Netsch
    Nags Head, NC
    --
  • Quotebetween a run and a broad reach in some of these rolling swells, and to our amazement, we watched as both hulls dove into a wave and submerged all the way to the forward crossbar. Fortunately, they popped out again and we kept going. I was just curious as to whether this is a known issue with Getaways


    This is the red zone for sure - on all beach cats i have sailed (i have owned H16 &18, mystere 5.5 & 6.0 and sailed most legacy cats made in the usa)

    between a reach and downwind where you go from sheeted out for downwind and in tight for reaching -

    the red zone is probably a bit "more" on main sans boom / sans diamond wires / 1:1 downhaul / sans ability to really control shape

    different cats react differently: from what i have seen most older legacy boat with deck lids and lips are typically much more prone to a full capsize and other smoother decks can often recover from both bows diving down. (not suggesting the lid is the issue, more like the era of beach cat that had the lip vs more modern lid shape & higher volume hull design)

    on my mystere's i can sail with bows underwater to the beam ... not for long as the resistance from the beam slows down the boat and the buoyancy will force the bows up. I have yet to ever see a 5.5 or bigger (Mystere) capsize from a stuff )

    so despite never sailing a getaway, i would suggest this is not an uncommon event when sailing in higher winds in the red zone (downhill/almost reaching).

    So rake, sail shape and management of weight placement are huge factors



    Edited by MN3 on Jun 29, 2020 - 12:09 PM.
  • Thanks. I'll be more conscious of this now that it's happened twice. I have to say we never had it happen with the Hobie 18, though, or on our first 2 years with the Getaway.
    Robert: our Getaway is a 2008. What's different about the bows on the 2019?
  • Peter: The new bows have a bit more volume i believe and perhaps a little more length at the waterline. There is a slight reverse deadrise. At least I think that is what it is called. It angles aft from the waterline up.

    --
    Robert Netsch
    Nags Head, NC
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  • Interesting. I haven't seen one yet.
  • https://www.hobie.com/sail/getaway/

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    Robert Netsch
    Nags Head, NC
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  • Thanks.

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