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Lazy Jacks  Bottom

  • Probably going to step in it here, but... I sail from a narrow fearsome concrete boat launch flanked by evil rip-rap. Frequently I come in to a lee shore. So, I de-power 50 yards out by pulling down my main. But I wind up with a pile of sail no matter how much I wrestle it down. Anybody heard of stringing up lazy-jacks on a beach cat?

    --
    Prindle 16
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  • Never seen it but don't understand the need or how it would work.
    Why not lower the sail, flake it over the boom (that's now resting on the rear crossbar) and tie it the same way you would on a keelboat?
    Our booms rise and lower dramatically depending on sail trim, lazy jacks would impede this movement, no?
    I would suggest adding furler before going through the trouble of designing a lazy jack system. Furl away the jib and the boat settles down in all but nuclear conditions.
    Just seems like the better call to me not knowing anything of the boat launch layout.

    --
    Joshua

    Texas Gulf Coast
    '82 Prindle 16 (Badfish)
    '02 Hobie Wave (Unnamed Project)
    ‘87 Hobie 18 (Sold)
    ‘89 Hobie 17 (ill-advised project boat, Sold)
    --
  • A Lazy jack seems a bit overkill to me too. I lower the main very often to land the boat, I just roll it up and tie it wiht the mainsheet. I take more space though, in case something goes wrong when lowering the main, like the halyard entangled or stuff like that.

    Here at the end of the video: 4:12 https://vimeo.com/201367382

    I have to detach the mainsheet blocks and the downhaul, for the former I have a hook and for the latter a fast shackle, so both are quickly done.
  • Quote I sail from a narrow fearsome concrete boat launch flanked by evil rip-rap.

    wow - that sounds harsh - and i don't even know what it means (rip-rap?)

    QuoteFrequently I come in to a lee shore. So, I de-power 50 yards out by pulling down my main. But I wind up with a pile of sail no matter how much I wrestle it down.

    if you anchor - you can take your time and roll up your sail and it will talk up very little room (but still be a pita on the deck)

    QuoteAnybody heard of stringing up lazy-jacks on a beach cat?

    i would think standard lazy jack system would create a real tangle hazard in a capsize or worse in any turtle situation - you could rig something that ran up and down the mast for storage ... but seems like a lot of work and additional spaghetti,


    i would explore all other options.
    i.e furling jib, anchor, perfecting your backing up skills, etc
  • Quotei don't even know what it means (rip-rap?)

    Loosely packed rock/stone/broken concrete to stop erosion.

    --
    Joshua

    Texas Gulf Coast
    '82 Prindle 16 (Badfish)
    '02 Hobie Wave (Unnamed Project)
    ‘87 Hobie 18 (Sold)
    ‘89 Hobie 17 (ill-advised project boat, Sold)
    --
  • QuoteLoosely packed rock/stone/broken concrete to stop erosion.

    gotcha - thanks -
    as suspected - harsh
  • AndinistaI just roll it up and tie it wiht the mainsheet.


    Just happened to be reading my Prindle owners' manual and noticed it said to do that w/ the rolled up main, as a way to initially secure it.

    Haven't yet had occasion to try rolling up my main while on the water though. Imagine that could be a handful if it's blowing.

    --
    1998 P18.2
    Sailing out of SHBCC, NJ
    --
  • Mad respect for you guys that launch and retrieve from concrete ramps. Only did it a few times when I was in the Keys and if it was my normal routine I'd probably only sail on youtube



    Edited by jalex on Jun 17, 2019 - 01:08 PM.
  • Has anyone out there seen a beachcat with slugs/sliders on the main? What would be the downside? It would help Prindle 16's "pile of sails" problem.

    --
    Bill Townsend
    G-Cat 5.7
    Sarasota
    --
  • shortyfoxHas anyone out there seen a beachcat with slugs/sliders on the main? What would be the downside? It would help Prindle 16's "pile of sails" problem.

    I use slugs in the head of my main so when it is reefed the bolt rope can't pop out of the track

    my 6.0 had slugs in the entire main when it was owned by a previous owner

    i see no advantage to them in a beachcat besides the lack of swelling that can happen in a used /old sail boltrope

    I have seen them jam up on a mono during sail raising


    not sure how they would help in any way with the "pile of sails" - you still end up with sails all over your deck/regardless of luff system -
  • Quoteure how they would help in any way with the "pile of sails" - you still end up with sails all over your deck/regardless of luff system


    https://forums.sailboatowners.com/proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fpurplesagetradingpost.com%2Fsumner%2Fmacgregor2%2F06-20-10-11-Slug%2520Gate.jpg&hash=a9ea8ec52e790743e40ecfd681d9abc6

    I think it could work. Too much hassle to me though
  • Andinista
    Quoteure how they would help in any way with the "pile of sails" - you still end up with sails all over your deck/regardless of luff system


    https://forums.sailboatowners.com/proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fpurplesagetradingpost.com%2Fsumner%2Fmacgregor2%2F06-20-10-11-Slug%2520Gate.jpg&hash=a9ea8ec52e790743e40ecfd681d9abc6

    I think it could work. Too much hassle to me though

    How would using track slugs/sliders help control the pile of main on your deck?
  • By keeping them on the track when lowering the main. Some sort of stopper is needed.
  • I have a lazy jack system I'm not using if your looking for one



    Edited by in812 on Jun 19, 2019 - 12:40 AM.

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    H14
    H16
    H18
    H18
    --
  • AndinistaBy keeping them on the track when lowering the main. Some sort of stopper is needed.

    Ahhh - gotcha - yes i think you are right that if you dropped the main onto the boom and left most of the slugs in the track it would help contain the main a bit.

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