Welcome anonymous guest

Please Support
TheBeachcats.com

How much water to expect in hulls?  Bottom

Go to page [-1] 1 - 2:

  • Agree with Edchris177 and the use of a dollar store balloon pump. Worked well, is light, cheap and does not generate enough pressure to damage the hulls. Bought two at the dollar store for $2.00. Just build up the tip with electrical tape, with a taper so it fits snuggly in the drain plug hole. Worked well to find leaks in my Prindle 18. My leaks were around the deck ports. Repaired with stainless bolts to replace the screws and some sealant. Replaced screws with bolts as screws would no longer snugly pull down hub of port.

    --
    Scott
    ARC 21
    Prindle 18
    Annapolis, Maryland
    --
  • After the discussion of how to conveniently pressurize the hulls without assistance, and without damaging the boat from over-pressurization, I just happened to run across something I hadn't previously noticed in my owner's manual for the P18.2:

    "Check for leaks at all hull fittings by covering these areas in detergent and blowing air (from your lungs) into the drain hole. DO NOT USE A VACUUM CLEANER AS THE EXCESS PRESSURE CAN DAMAGE THE HULLS. If detergent bubbles, there is a leak."

    I hadn't considered that lung power alone might be enough, but apparently it is. So I guess that's about the most basic way to do it.



    Edited by CatFan57 on Aug 07, 2018 - 09:08 AM.

    --
    P18.2
    NJ
    --
  • Recommended earlier in the thread....

    Dogboy
    IMO, the best way to pressurize your hull is to take a piece of tubing and jam it into the drain plug. Blow half a dozen or so lung fulls into the hull and then clamp off the tube. Then go around the boat spraying the hulls with soapy water (a windex type squirt bottle works best). Anywhere you see bubbles, you have a leak. You will have to "re-inflate" the hulls every couple minutes as you go. I have checked for leaks on several boats using this method and it works great. I would not risk damaging the boat using a mechanical pump- especially on a rotomolded boat where the damage would not be able to be repaired.


    Wrap several layers of electrical or duct tape around the end of the hose and you can thread it into the drain plug fitting for a reasonably air tight seal.

    sm
  • How about those of us that don't have drain plugs? All I've got is an access port at the back of each hull. Do I take a sheet of rubber, tape it over the access port and then make a small hole for the tubing?

    --
    Dana, Holly, Emma & Hannah

    LJ/Stu's Dart 18
    --
  • dartsailorsHow about those of us that don't have drain plugs? All I've got is an access port at the back of each hull. Do I take a sheet of rubber, tape it over the access port and then make a small hole for the tubing?

    how much water do you get in your hulls?
    if very little - than there is nothing to worry about

    if you get more than you can get out with a sponge you might get a sheet of rubber to work but i don't know how you will attach it.
    you may need to modify a lid to get it to work well - i may have old ones i would sacrifice if you need it - or look through Parker's garage - he has been squirreling away parts for decades
  • dartsailorsHow about those of us that don't have drain plugs? All I've got is an access port at the back of each hull. Do I take a sheet of rubber, tape it over the access port and then make a small hole for the tubing?


    I would purchase an extra access port cover, drill a hole in the top of it and tap it for a 1/8” or 1/4” NPT pipe fitting. Then purchase a brass pipe fitting with an Male NPT thread on one end and a barbed hose connection on the opposite end. Thread the pipe fitting into the access port cover, push a 10” long hose onto the other end, and then install the access port into the hull to allow you to pressurize the hull.

    sm
  • DogboyRecommended earlier in the thread....

    Dogboy
    IMO, the best way to pressurize your hull is to take a piece of tubing and jam it into the drain plug. Blow half a dozen or so lung fulls into the hull and then clamp off the tube. Then go around the boat spraying the hulls with soapy water (a windex type squirt bottle works best). Anywhere you see bubbles, you have a leak. You will have to "re-inflate" the hulls every couple minutes as you go. I have checked for leaks on several boats using this method and it works great. I would not risk damaging the boat using a mechanical pump- especially on a rotomolded boat where the damage would not be able to be repaired.


    Wrap several layers of electrical or duct tape around the end of the hose and you can thread it into the drain plug fitting for a reasonably air tight seal.

    sm


    Sorry, good point; I hadn't looked at the thread in a while and forgot you already suggested using lung power with a tube.

    --
    P18.2
    NJ
    --
  • MN3
    dartsailorsHow about those of us that don't have drain plugs? All I've got is an access port at the back of each hull. Do I take a sheet of rubber, tape it over the access port and then make a small hole for the tubing?

    how much water do you get in your hulls?
    if very little - than there is nothing to worry about

    if you get more than you can get out with a sponge you might get a sheet of rubber to work but i don't know how you will attach it.
    you may need to modify a lid to get it to work well - i may have old ones i would sacrifice if you need it - or look through Parker's garage - he has been squirreling away parts for decades


    It really depends. If it's been raining a lot, I get 5-6 sponges out of the starboard hull. Port hull stays dry. I inquired because if its an easy fix (caulk or something like that) I'd do it just to avoid the sponge routine.

    When I park the boat, I have lids with the center drilled out and a pvc elbow that I insert. One of Stu's inventions. It actually allows the water to evaporate, but doesn't solve the problem totally. I think it's a good solution for an age old problem.

    --
    Dana, Holly, Emma & Hannah

    LJ/Stu's Dart 18
    --
  • dartsailors
    MN3
    dartsailorsHow about those of us that don't have drain plugs? All I've got is an access port at the back of each hull. Do I take a sheet of rubber, tape it over the access port and then make a small hole for the tubing?

    how much water do you get in your hulls?
    if very little - than there is nothing to worry about

    if you get more than you can get out with a sponge you might get a sheet of rubber to work but i don't know how you will attach it.
    you may need to modify a lid to get it to work well - i may have old ones i would sacrifice if you need it - or look through Parker's garage - he has been squirreling away parts for decades


    It really depends. If it's been raining a lot, I get 5-6 sponges out of the starboard hull. Port hull stays dry. I inquired because if its an easy fix (caulk or something like that) I'd do it just to avoid the sponge routine.

    When I park the boat, I have lids with the center drilled out and a pvc elbow that I insert. One of Stu's inventions. It actually allows the water to evaporate, but doesn't solve the problem totally. I think it's a good solution for an age old problem.

    actually was my invention to let moisture out and avoid rain and cats from getting in my 6" ports (yes cats) :)

    water that gets in from rain is typically getting in under the beams, around the beam bolts and under the trampoline track
    but since you don't have any bolts ... i would GUESS that it's coming in from the tracks and/or your port lids

    If it's your lids - some silicone around them may help
    if it's your tramp tracks ... you can try some silicone on the rivets but not sure that's gonna due much - often the rivets worm holes into the gelcoat under the track - it's nearly impossible to seal them from above.

    A tarp may be your solution to this - and will extend the life of your tramp/lines/gelcoat and even metal fittings but does come with added work (removal and re-tarping), expense since even high quality tarps don't last that long here)

    Do you get water in the hulls after sailing?
    If yes i would expect it to be highly dependent on the wind/water conditions
    my hulls are dry in light air but my big deck port lets a fair amount of water in when i am moving over 10knots (the spray up the hull gets in)



    Edited by MN3 on Aug 09, 2018 - 10:21 AM.
  • On the pvc vents, I'm happy to give credit where it is due, which wasn't me. Although I have wondered if you could add a solar powered fan to it. Reverse the fan direction so that it's drawing out of the hull.

    I don't think I get water in the hulls from sailing. I think it's entirely rain and I do cover the boat with a tarp.

    For example, I hadn't had the boat out in over 2 months when I pulled it out last weekend. I pulled about 5-6 sponges of water from the starboard hull. If I have it out more frequently, it's less, but that's likely because I check each time and wring out what I can.

    I might have to taste some of it next time to see if it's salty ...

    --
    Dana, Holly, Emma & Hannah

    LJ/Stu's Dart 18
    --
  • QuoteI might have to taste some of it next time to see if it's salty ...

    haha
    I would save that job for your kids
  • I continue to get many "sponges" full of water after every sail in my starboard hull. Did the air pressure test with soapy water and did not see any bubbles. Epoxied the keels with couple layers of 2 inch wide 10 feet long glass, but still water getting in. Did not check crossbars yet, but it must be coming from there... Very frustrated that I can't find the leak.

    --
    Frank
    Prindle 15/hobie 14
    --
  • Did you check the entire length of the seam where the deck is bonded to the hull?

    sm

Go to page [-1] 1 - 2:

This list is based on users active over the last 60 minutes.

  • October 18, 2018
  • No events scheduled.

Upcoming Beachcats Events

VIEW FULL CALENDAR