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pricing - Prindle 16  Bottom

  • I have a 1978 Prindle 16. The standing rigging (every bit of it) was all replaced last year, as was most of the running rigging. The tramp is in great condition, I have two good mainsails and one jib, two booms, all in good condition, rudders are good, no soft spots in the hulls. It's on a freshly painted trailer with new lights, new wheels, wheel bearings, and tires, new safety chains, new hand winch, and refurbed sail box.

    Last year I bought a 1979 Prindle 16. I like its color better, and i like its trailer a little better, but it needs new rigging, tramp, and trailer restoration, which is going to cost me some money. Originally I planned to fix it up and sell it, just so it didn't end up in the dump, but now I am thinking I'll sell the other one and keep this one.

    I am well aware that I have put money into the original boat and trailer beyond what I can expect to get out of it. That's fine - I'm not looking to profit from it. The problem I have is that when I look at what people have listed other Prindle 16s for, it's all over the place, regardless of condition. I've seen decent ones listed for $1000, and others that look pretty weather worn for three times that much (though that's probably not close to a realistic price).

    Looking for some suggestions on how to price it so I can get to work on the other one and get back to sailing this summer when my shoulder rehab is done.

    thanks,
    -Matt
  • Hmm, I think I would cherry pick the best parts and make the best boat since their parts are interchangeable and sell the project boat at discount and go sailing ?

    --
    Dart 20
    --
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  • westmattI have a 1978 Prindle 16. The standing rigging (every bit of it) was all replaced last year, as was most of the running rigging. The tramp is in great condition, I have two good mainsails and one jib, two booms, all in good condition, rudders are good, no soft spots in the hulls. It's on a freshly painted trailer with new lights, new wheels, wheel bearings, and tires, new safety chains, new hand winch, and refurbed sail box.

    Last year I bought a 1979 Prindle 16. I like its color better, and i like its trailer a little better, but it needs new rigging, tramp, and trailer restoration, which is going to cost me some money. Originally I planned to fix it up and sell it, just so it didn't end up in the dump, but now I am thinking I'll sell the other one and keep this one.

    I am well aware that I have put money into the original boat and trailer beyond what I can expect to get out of it. That's fine - I'm not looking to profit from it. The problem I have is that when I look at what people have listed other Prindle 16s for, it's all over the place, regardless of condition. I've seen decent ones listed for $1000, and others that look pretty weather worn for three times that much (though that's probably not close to a realistic price).

    Looking for some suggestions on how to price it so I can get to work on the other one and get back to sailing this summer when my shoulder rehab is done.

    thanks,
    -Matt



    There are a lot of factors: sailing area; hull, sail, trailer, and line condition; and odd ball extras that really don't add value. 80% of the people selling a boat feel their sails are in great condition. With your location, that is crucial for pricing. If someone has to drive 500+ miles to buy a boat listed for a premium usually isn't worth it. The cost of fuel and expenses to pick it up is a huge factor, unless it is a unique boat and someone is determined to get it. As these boats age, the good/excellent condition of a boat becomes more and more rare. Now, a couple of years ago, you could easily name the price and people would pay it, but not now. To me, a late 70's early 80's P16 would start at $1k and will go up/down from there depending on the above mentioned condition. Also, it depends on how fast you want to sell it. No one really wants to leave money on the table, but sometimes unloading a boat sooner than later is worth more than a couple of hundred bucks.

    --
    Scott

    Prindle Fleet 2
    TCDYC

    Prindle 18-2 Mod "FrankenKitty"
    Tornado Classic "Fast Furniture"
    Prindle 19 "Mr. Wiggly"
    Nacra 5.8 "De ja vu"
    Nacra 5.0
    Nacra 5.8
    Tornadoes (Reg White)
    --
  • QuoteI am well aware that I have put money into the original boat and trailer beyond what I can expect to get out of it.

    I agree with restoring "legacy" beach cats is generally a losing proposition, at least money wise. The old adage, "The sum of the parts is greater than the whole" really applies. I've restored 3 G-Cats over the years, one 5.0 and two 5.7s and sold them all for a loss. But I had fun doing it, learned things and sailed them. My current boat, a 5.0 I bought for 2K in 2018 and it was freshwater sailed for a good portion of it's life. I replaced the sails, tramps and lots of other stuff and have over 4K invested. I'll probably sell it within a year and judging by today's market will be lucky to get what I paid for it. But I had a great time sailing it and I'll have the satisfaction of knowing whoever winds up with it will get a boat that sails like it's new.

    --
    Bill Townsend
    G-Cat 5.0
    Sarasota
    --
  • Thanks - appreciate the words of wisdom. I was under no illusions that I would profit from either boat. Just enjoy fixing things and then using them.

    "80% of the people selling a boat feel their sails are in great condition." I imagine this is true, and I would represent mine as 'good,' not great. Are they suitable for racing? Probably not, but no one is going to race this boat and they are perfectly suitable for the recreational sailing that's most likely to be done on this boat.

    Thanks Scott for your 1k figure - I'll give it some more thought, but that's kind of where I was, price-wise..

    -Matt



    Edited by westmatt on Apr 11, 2024 - 10:36 AM.

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