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Keeping the lines fair when stepping the mast on nacra 5.7  Bottom

  • I sometimes have a problem with the forestay and jib halyard wrapping around each other when raising the mast. Any suggestions on how to best keep the forestay and jib halaryd fair? I always step the mast solo using a ladder with a rope around a pulley attached to the trailer and eye high on the mast to hold the mast while I pin the forestay.
  • Wrap a piece of Velcro around the mast to hold them just right. icon_wink

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    Bill 404 21SE
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  • Trolling again icon_rolleyes ? Read "Mast assembly" Procedure: 9. in the 1985 Assembly Manual!



    Edited by revintage on Nov 04, 2021 - 10:02 AM.

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    Brgds
    Lars

    Frankencat 5.5/F18
    Soon Frankencat 5.8/F20
    49er
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1192604934176635
    --
  • Ignoring the trolling attempt but putting information here for a future user that might have a genuine question.

    Simply put there is no reason your job halyard should be free to move around loosely while dealing with the forestay. If the jib halyard remains secured it cannot foul the forestay.
  • the velcro idea works great and is clear.
    thank you.
  • Hey Rungi,
    Whats wrong following the assembly manual, instead of adding unnecessary gadgets like velcros?
    Use the KISS-principle (Keep It Simple, Stupid) icon_wink .
    http://soderquist.se/tieoff.png



    Edited by revintage on Nov 05, 2021 - 02:48 PM.

    --
    Brgds
    Lars

    Frankencat 5.5/F18
    Soon Frankencat 5.8/F20
    49er
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1192604934176635
    --
  • There is nothing wrong with it thanks for posting the step. The velcro is convenient and it is a tie down. Not sure about your use of the word unnecessary gadget. It is unnecessary to tie down the jib halyard at all but it makes it easier. The manual state to just tie off the halyards. It does not specify the gadget or mention to tie down the forestay.

    I do not tie down the main halyard because it is hooked to the down haul for trailering it is an extra step not needed when stepping the mast.

    The forestay (if not tied down) can still potentially swing around the side stay/tapeze/diamond wires especially in the wind that is why I like the idea about tie down together with velcro strap.

    Have you step the mast on a Nacra 5.7 solo?
  • What is confusing is that we normally tie the halyards for trailering, and just untie them AFTER stepping the mast. The halyards are typically a line, just tie that line, no need for a velcro. But your halyards are apparently wire? I thought you said that you changed the jib one for line. The forestay, on the other hand, is a wire that more likely will be rolled and put on the tramp for trailering. If it’s the only loose wire then it is unlikely that it gets tangled with other lines or wires. What I do is keeping the stay adjuster on the forestay when I remove it. This way i keep the adjustment pin always on the same (or most often used) position and don’t think much about it next time. The other advantage is that I can pass it through other lines on the mast base or through the mast rotator when stepping the mast, So that I know where it is when I need it. Sometimes I let it loose too, no big deal. For short distance travels I don’t tie the forestay to the tramp either, i use the adjuster to lock it under the foot strap.



    Edited by Andinista on Nov 06, 2021 - 05:38 AM.
  • rungiHave you step the mast on a Nacra 5.7 solo?


    Being past 70 with lessened strength, I still step and lower the longer F18 mast on my 5.5 with one hand. I step it from the front, but if you have a trailer with a winch you should step it from the rear. The answer is gin pole icon_cool . You will have to invest in a pair of 5 dollar tie down ratchets or, even simpler, use two lines, though. Trapeze wires attached to main beam ends, No high forces involved, should be ca 100lb tension in the winch cable.

    http://soderquist.se/down2.jpg



    Edited by revintage on Nov 06, 2021 - 08:49 AM.

    --
    Brgds
    Lars

    Frankencat 5.5/F18
    Soon Frankencat 5.8/F20
    49er
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1192604934176635
    --
  • It is very important to tie the forestay. Because the jib halyard is lower it is less likely to get wrapped up but it is should be tied too. Not sure why manual does not state to secure the forestay. The manual does not discuss solo mast raising.

    It is important to do this or you may have to lower the mast again. I have had this happen several times.
    Another thing that is important if stepping the mast on the trailer is to make sure the boat is far enough back on the trailer to allow the bridle to come up all the way up. If the boat is not moved back the mast holder/winch post impedes raising the bridle and chain plate and you cannot pin the forestay until you move the boat back.

    Also, don't forget to wind up the roller with line before pinning the forestay. Also did this twice.
    A check list is good idea if you are teaching yourself.

    I found it difficult to use velco because the weight of the forestay is heavy when held at tension so i thread a line through the forestay and run both ends to a cleat on the lower part of the mast for the original jib halyard non modified system as described in the manual.

    This allows you to tension the forestay and quickly release it so you can hop of the tramp and pin it.
    If you step the mast so the bow is facing down hill then the pulley is not needed to hold the mast up.
    It requires a little more strength but saves time. Beware the wind can easily blown down
    the mast even if leaning a little forward. Safest to use a pulley. Also allows you to relax after stepping the mast before pining the forestay.

    You can step the mast in about 10 seconds and it takes about 5 minutes to untie everything and move the mast into position.

    Another thing to remember is to make sure the side stays are pinned at the top of the chain plate.
    after the forestay is pinned the side stays can be lowered to desired tension. I always go 5 down. I am not that experienced with this but it works well in all conditions I have sailed in.

    Before lifting the mast upright make sure you have the pin in, place a ladder or use a fence to set the top end of mast above the horn on the mast so the lines do not interfere when raising.
    Anyway, that is what I do now and it works well.
  • QuoteIt is important to do this or you may have to lower the mast again. I have had this happen several times.

    Or capsize the boat on the ground, that’s easier.

    rungiIf you step the mast so the bow is facing down hill then the pulley is not needed to hold the mast up. It requires a little more strength but saves time.

    When the bows are facing down the hill it’s easier to step the mast, because you can grab it from a higher position. Try stepping it with the bows facing uphill and you will see.
  • Quote If the boat is not moved back the mast holder/winch post impedes raising the bridle and chain plate and you cannot pin the forestay until you move the boat back.


    This is very much dependent on your specific trailer. I’ve seen many a trailer (and own one myself) that allow for pinning the forestay with the boat in it’s normal traveling position. As a matter of fact every cat on a trailer at a mast up storage location does so without the front bridle hitting the winch pole.
  • carbonc
    Quote If the boat is not moved back the mast holder/winch post impedes raising the bridle and chain plate and you cannot pin the forestay until you move the boat back.


    This is very much dependent on your specific trailer. I’ve seen many a trailer (and own one myself) that allow for pinning the forestay with the boat in it’s normal traveling position. As a matter of fact every cat on a trailer at a mast up storage location does so without the front bridle hitting the winch pole.

    I agree, Rungi’s problem is the exception rather than the rule. And don’t forget to secure the boat to the trailer again after moving it backwards. It is probably easy to move that mast support forward, maybe just loosen a couple couple u-bolts.
  • anyone know the history of how nacra 5.7 were sold
    manual seems to show u assemble them after buying them
    anyone ever bought a brand new nacra 5.7 in 1984?
  • QuoteAnother thing to remember is to make sure the side stays are pinned at the top of the chain plate.
    after the forestay is pinned the side stays can be lowered to desired tension. I always go 5 down. I am not that experienced with this but it works well in all conditions I have sailed in.

    It’s enough to leave one shroud loose, no need to readjust both. With heavier wind the rig needs more tension, but not to the point to considerably restrict mast rotation. The tension you get when you hang on the trapeze is a good reference. I personally adjust it always the same too, but I’m just a recreational sailor, and I prefer to pass on lighter conditions, under 8 kts or so.
  • Nacras in the 80 were mainly sold through boat dealers that assembled the boats prior to sale. I'm sure that there may have been a direct sales channel, but I don't recall anyone unboxing a new one and building it. In the early 80s, Nacra operated under the company name Performance Catamarans in Santa Barbara, CA, and there was a very active fleet in southern and central California. The Nacra 5.0 and 5.7 were skegg hulled boats without centerboards or booms, and were mostly recreational, although they performed very well against similar size Prindles and Hobie Cats.

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    Tom
    NACRA 5.7 (1984 Sail 181)
    Pennsylvania
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  • rungiI sometimes have a problem with the forestay and jib halyard wrapping around each other when raising the mast. Any suggestions on how to best keep the forestay and jib halaryd fair? I always step the mast solo using a ladder with a rope around a pulley attached to the trailer and eye high on the mast to hold the mast while I pin the forestay.


    I tie the tails of the jib halyard together and secure it on the mast rotator near the mast. I have my raising system attached to the forestay when raising the mast. I do this solo and use a 6' ladder.

    I have done a video of the stepping and the general set-up: https://youtu.be/KjPgEDVKAZk

    Message me if you have questions. I had 2 Nacra 5.8s and a Nacra 5.0 and raced a 6.0 for a few years.

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    Scott

    Prindle 18-2 Mod "FrankenKitty"
    Tornado Classic "Fast Furniture"
    Prindle 19 "Mr. Wiggly" - gone
    Nacra 5.8 "De ja vu"
    Nacra 5.0
    Nacra 5.8
    Tornadoes (Reg White)
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  • I now have a system that works perfectly for the nacra 5.7. I solo step the mast and rig it in less than 5 minutes. 4 minutes are untying and moving the mast back and making both sides stays and trapeze fair and on the correct side. The mast must be picked up in the very middle and walked back. Be careful doing this easy to tip and hit the car or tramp or tie bar. Place top end on ladder or fence so the mast rest a few feet above the horn. Check the distance before moving the mast. Be careful so the mast does not fall off the ladder when walking to the front beam to secure the base on the ball The mast can be pushed onto the ball or set close to the ball. Walk to the front beam and place on the ball and pin it. The forestay is best held tight by threading a small rope through it that can be quickly removed once mast is up. This was key to figuring out how to easily step and pin the forestay without it wrapping about anything. Velcro and tying are difficult in my experience because the forestay is heavy and difficult to tie to. The halyard is lower than the forestay so in my experience it does not need to be tied at all. In windy conditions you might have to unwarp it so it is probably a good idea to tie it to the forestay to keep the halyard fair.

    Make sure you the bridle can clear the post before raising the mast.
    Make sure you wind the rope in the roller
    Make sure you put the pin in the mast base
    Make sure the trapeze and side stays are on the correct side and will not catch the hulls or rudder.
    Make sure the line attached to the mast that goes to the pulley on the trailer post to hold the mast up has a tag line to pull it out.
    Make sure the side stays are pinned at the top before raising the mast then adjust them once the forestay is pinned.

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