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Access hatches  Bottom

  • I'm looking at what I want to change to my Dart 18 for the next everglades challenge, and one thing that became clear is that the gear strapped to the tramp has got to go in the hulls. If I do that, the deck load won't be so grabby of lines, I'll be able to move my weight to sail the boat more efficiently, and overall weight will be lower.
    I've talked to some guys who use long skinny dry bags and feed them through round access hatches. This is probably the simplest and most reliable way. The curve of the deck is more than a round hatch can be screwed to, but I can build up a flat spot to attach the hatch.
    Is there a way to build or buy waterproof hatches that would be bigger and easier to load? I picture a laminated plywood hatch cover that matches the curve of the deck, but I fear it will leak a lot.
    Plan C might look like this: https://www.westmarine.com/buy/imtra-corporation--rectangular-hatch--17193103?recordNum=12
  • Both my Mystere's have square hatches like your "plan C"
    I wish neither were there.
    my confidence is not supper high they would be water tight in a capsize (the latch wears down over time)

    they are not a safe option in an endurance event imho
  • Yeah, I suspected as much. Even dry bags are a relative thing in those conditions
  • With a large rectangular hatch, you would probably have enough room to glass in bulkheads fore & aft to make a water-tight compartment. If the hatch did leak, you would not flood the entire hull.

    sm
  • DogboyWith a large rectangular hatch, you would probably have enough room to glass in bulkheads fore & aft to make a water-tight compartment. If the hatch did leak, you would not flood the entire hull.

    sm

    not a bad idea
    i would want a drain plug somewhere to drain it too

    maybe a project for me over the next few weeks
  • Not sure what conditions you are up against, but on camping trips to the Channel Islands, we didn't keep much weight in the hulls. The aversion to this was based on the idea that in a capsize situation, the added weight might turtle the boat, and also inhibit righting. And if the boat is upside down, you're not going to be able to get rid of the weight, as the hatches will be submerged.

    On the H18, our cargo bags went just behind the mast, with cargo straps leading to a ripcord system under the trampoline where the bags could be released quickly in a capsize, if needed. Also, I had a secondary set of cargo straps rigged at the rear of the trampoline, in case conditions had me wanting to shift the weight back. That would be a pain in the a** on tacks, but on channel crossings we are typically on one tack for 20 miles.

    Your mileage may vary. Just some things to consider.

    --
    Bill Mattson
    Prindle 19 "Gelli Bean"
    Prindle 19 "Cat's Pajamas"
    --
  • I had 3 large drybags plus a duffle bag for incidentals on the tramp. Conditions this year were pretty extreme. Even a good quality drybag would leak if it wasn't carefully rolled up tight and my Spot gps tracker didn't have a chance of survival on deck past day 1.

    I did have a plan in the back of my mind that I could unclip the bags in event of a capsize and let them float on a tether or use them to help right the boat. I'm not sure how practical that idea would be in the wind/wave conditions I was in. Having the weight in the hulls would be better than on the tramp in terms of turtling. I think the best way to deal with a capsize (besides prevention) is a robust and easily deployable righting pole.

    As for weight transfer, the dart has finer hulls than a prindle. My 200 lbs can trim the boat the way I want it. If I have enough power to submarine the bows, I can always reef.

    I like the bulkhead idea. It would also help restore structural integrity from the hole.
  • jeff 96I like the bulkhead idea. It would also help restore structural integrity from the hole.

    So the port in the hull would have to be big enough diagonally to allow you to put a full size one-piece bulkhead inside the hull. It would be difficult to engineer a two piece bulkhead that will withstand the pressures endured. You are only going to be able to glass in it place from one side = weak. Measure twice before you buy or cut. Your hole will be bigger than the port opening, so that may be a help.

    (Spurious fact: Manhole covers are round so they can never fall into the hole.)



    Edited by klozhald on Mar 23, 2020 - 03:55 PM.

    --
    Sheet In!
    Bob
    ___/)_____/)_/)____/)____/)_____/)/)__________/)__
    Prindle 18-2 #244 "Wakizashi"
    Prindle 16 #3690 "Pegasus" Sold (sigh)
    AZ Multihull Fleet 42 member
    (Way) Past Commodore of Prindle Fleet 14
    Arizona, USA
    --
  • Quote(Spurious fact: Manhole covers are round so they can never fall into the hole.)

    nice! never knew that

    QuoteSo the port in the hull would have to be big enough diagonally to allow you to put a full size one-piece bulkhead inside the hull. It would be difficult to engineer a two piece bulkhead that will withstand the pressures endured

    we had a local who built a beer cooler into his prindle hull...
  • MN3we had a local who built a beer cooler into his prindle hull...

    Well, that combines my two favorite pastimes!

    --
    Sheet In!
    Bob
    ___/)_____/)_/)____/)____/)_____/)/)__________/)__
    Prindle 18-2 #244 "Wakizashi"
    Prindle 16 #3690 "Pegasus" Sold (sigh)
    AZ Multihull Fleet 42 member
    (Way) Past Commodore of Prindle Fleet 14
    Arizona, USA
    --
  • The dart catamaran hulls have solid foam that acts as hull stiffening and doesn't allow for much internal storage.

    --
    Dart 20
    --
  • Bulkhead could be glassed (at least partially) from both sides by glassing on “tabs” on the backside that are then bonded (epoxied) to the hull. A two-piece bulkhead would also be a potential option, reinforced using stiffening ribs. I would definitely figure out the necessary size/shape using cardboard or similar templates before cutting HD foam. All doable with some thought and patience.

    sm
  • Probably going to go with a RWO screw in hatch. If I've learned one thing about ocean sailing, it's that simple is better.

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