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Remember To Hook Your Hook  Bottom

  • Before you lean back !@#$!@#$!@#$

    https://www.youtube.com/w…vGIT984&feature=youtu.be

    --
    Hobie 16 (3 formerly)
    MacGregor 25 (formerly)
    Chrysler Dagger 14 (formerly)
    NACRA 5.0 (currently)
    High Point, NC
    --
  • NICE!

    he did 2 things right
    let go of the tiller (expensive yet fragile part to replace)
    held on to the sheet - NEVER let go
  • Loved the slow motion video backwards....

    I have had a crew do that. Funny watching them take a splash like I did it on purpose to them.
  • I was in a race once and it kept switching between trap and non trap weather. Eventually I forgot I wasn't hooked in and went to trap. My mainsheet was tight so I was able to stay on the side of the boat by holding onto rope the boat but my life vest kept getting caught on the dumb H18 hull lip and it took me a few tries to get back on the boat.

    --
    Matt
    '82 NACRA 18 Square
    '85 Hobie 18 "Honey Badger Don't Care"
    '86 Hobie 18 "The Rippin & The Tearin"
    Clearwater, FL
    --
  • MN3he did 2 things right
    let go of the tiller (expensive yet fragile part to replace)
    held on to the sheet - NEVER let go


    +1

    --
    Hobie 16 (3 formerly)
    MacGregor 25 (formerly)
    Chrysler Dagger 14 (formerly)
    NACRA 5.0 (currently)
    High Point, NC
    --
  • I did the exact same thing a couple weeks ago on the Prindle 19. It was my first solo sail on the boat. I had a Soloright righting pole rigged for my H18. The night before I modified it for what I thought would work for the P19, changing the part that locked onto the H18 deck lip into an aluminum plate that I figured would fit into the daggerboard well of the P19. Not having the P19 on it's side to fit the device I just sorta winged it in my workshop.

    While sailing solo, I have a habit of being hooked onto the trap wire all the time just for added stability. I also have a jack line with a tether which I always use when sailing solo. It had been a light wind day, but in the afternoon it finally came up a bit. I leave the deck to trap out and basically, just jump off the boat into the water. I'm looking skyward as the hull is rising, and am not sure if I can even right the boat. I'm trying to pull the hull back down with the mainsheet, which obviously has other implications. The boat capsizes. I'm about a mile out, so I have plenty of time to rig the pole, and it worked just fine.

    I'd like to say that I'll never do that again, but I just can't be sure of that.

    --
    Bill Mattson
    Hobie 18 "Cheap Thrill"
    Prindle 19 "Gelli Bean"
    --
  • While remembering to hook in, also make sure your harness is in good shape too...

    Got hooked up (pun) with a crew for sailing one day and they showed up with their own sailing gear... It had been a few years since they sailed but still had all the gear.. The harness was one of those old Hobie style straight jacket harness where the metal hook was sewn into the harness. It looked real uncomfortable so I had offered the use of one of mine, but this guy was OK with what he had... I should have inspected it...

    We're cooking along pretty good on a NACRA 5.8, both of us trapped out, block to block on a screaming beam reach when I hear this Rrrrrrrriiiiiiiiiipppppppp. I look over just in time to see the crew slide into the water with both hand flailing to grab something or anything..... and with what remained of the harness still attached to the boat..

    Sheet out, travel out, head up to the wind took over in my mind to keep the boat from cartwheeling. In doing all of this I violate the first rule on MOB and that is keep the MOB in sight specifically in the ocean and in this case the shipping lanes. After a few minutes of not being able to locate him I am getting little panicky and getting ready to call in a "Dust Off" hoping one of those orange and white helicopters are close by. Just then I spot him a good 50 yards away with hands waving. Keeping eyes on him I sailed over picked him up, and after assuring me he was OK, I could see he was a little shaken... Back to the dock we went.

    While heading in we looked at what was left of the harness still attached to the trap... there was some rust and dry rot and he admitted to having gained a few pounds since the last time he used it. I asked if he had a whistle which he did.... attached to the harness...

    As my father always said, a smart man learns from his mistakes and a wise man learns from a smart man. My take-a-way is that since this incident I have purchase a few boats that came with all the associated gear, PFD, harness etc... The first thing in the trash are the harnesses and PFDs, the second thing is the standing rigging. But that is another story!!



    Edited by JohnES on Oct 06, 2017 - 08:19 PM.
  • On the same subject, I was about 3 miles out on the Hobie 18 by myself a couple years back on a beautiful sunny day in moderate wind and flat seas. Trapped out and just enjoying the day. All is good.

    *Snap*

    Trapeze wire fails at the lower swage, and I'm in the water. I ALWAYS wear a safety tether when solo and it really saved my bacon this time. I had been going to weather, and as I went off the boat I let go of the main sheet which was not cleated. The boat stayed upright, and with the jib still cleated started weathervaning downwind. I'm being dragged by the tether, and could not get a good puchase on what I could reach of the tiller casting. So I grabbed the rudder blade underwater and steered the boat upwind.

    The tether system includes a simple jack line run across the the rear of the trampoline, tied to the lacing on each end. The tether itself is a 5/8 inch line with a carabiner on the jackline end and a double d quick release shackle on the sailor end, with a small control line covered in plastic hose, for quick release if I need to cut myself loose.

    --
    Bill Mattson
    Hobie 18 "Cheap Thrill"
    Prindle 19 "Gelli Bean"
    --

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