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nacra 5.7  Bottom

  • What is the best way to raise and lower the sail while it is windy on a 5.7

    The boat itself is a sail even with no sails up.
    You can sail to some extent with no sails.
    Even in light winds raising the main sail is not easy for me. The boat begins to sail. As soon as the hulls catch wind
    Are there any techniques to get the main up in windy condition.
    I am surprised how fast this boat with go with just the furling jib which is easy to open even in strong winds.
  • what is your current method?
    are you anchored? if not you must be

    why don't you put your jib and main on on shore? if you face directly into the wind - you wont move forward
  • He's got tight launching conditions. Have to echo - either anchor (small folding anchor) or if you have a motor - holding it into the wind; but that takes 2 people. Has to be into the wind to work, and best, if by yourself to have the luff track really clean and bolt rope sprayed with dry lubricant (PB Blaster).

    I also would like to hear about any solo raising techniques while on the water - have had my share of easy and "kick in the face hard" times... Usually, though it's something I'm missing or not doing right.

    --
    Chuck C.
    H21SE 408
    --
  • the jib is not a problem because the furler
    the anchor idea seems likes it will work
    i was thinking to fold the main like a accordian
    but any wind can take the sail away.
    too dangerous to raise main on land due to small beach
  • I have experience lowering the main on the water, not so much raising it. I think I did it once or twice and didn't have troubles but the wind was´t very strong. The challenge is to keep the boat facing into the wind or close. I manually rotate the mast often to have it pointing into the wind if the boat isn't, this is critical, the rotator helps. You have to sail backwards most of the time and eventually forward to correct the angle. Basically you raise the main during the slots of time where the boat direction allows it, and then deal with boat direction again. I've never rolled the jib, I suggest to test with the jib on, it helps keeping and correcting the angle. Some times backwinding it if necessary. You need some room and a crew. If it's tight, then yes, you need an anchor. Waves can make it much harder too. I needed to lower the main on a lake, sometimes I landed on a safer spot just to lower (or raising in your case) the main, that's an option too. I also suggest a rigging tool like this one, to protect your hands and to be more effective connecting the ring.
  • thanks for the details.
    An anchor is a must - you NEED it to right your boat (or the boat will move and sail around as you move about, and make pointing into the wind very hard while on your side)

    if you raise/lower on the water that is the way to make it easy - forget 2 people - if you have crew you want them at the mast base helping the sail go in the track as you pull the halyard

    Forget the folding anchor - they will not hold in all conditions and will fail at the worst time - i recommend for a majority of conditions (i do not know yours) a lightweight alum folding danforth style - spend the $85 for a good one, it is light and will last for many boats

    (Fortress Guardian G-7 2.9lb Anchor [G-7] Regular price$86.00 )
    or get the heavy steel one - your choice


    Put your jib on land and furl,
    anchor in the shallowest spot (but with room to swing with a change of wind direction while on anchor) with everything ready

    yes fold your sail in accordion pile (google how to flake a sail) and lash it with some line or put some stuff on top of the sail so it wont blow off until you get ready to attach the head to the halyard

    As mentioned, you want a real clean masttrack and luff (and make sure your bolt rope isn't swollen or your track isn't pinched) and a lubed up boltrope - search this site for tips methods

    stand to one side of the pile, wear your gloves and pull it up, adjust the bolt rope/track as needed and pull again, repeat 10 or so times. (be glad you have no boom and rotator at this time)

    Same with taking the main down on the water - anchor and it is easy



    Edited by MN3 on Sep 23, 2021 - 01:06 PM.
  • double post deleted



    Edited by Andinista on Sep 23, 2021 - 12:59 PM.
  • I usually am able to raise the main on the beach. If the wind is from the beam then I have to ensure the sail battens clear the shrouds and trapeze wires until it is half-way up. Then I just pull the halyard and keep the mast twisted to reduce friction as the sail goes up. Sometimes need help to keep the sail out of the shrouds. If wind is too strong from behind, I pull the boat around so the bows face into the wind. It should luff without the sheets and downhaul attached or pulled tight. Hope you have beach wheels. I have never had to put the sails up on the water, and I have not lost control of the boat on the beach as long as blocks and sheets are not hooked in.

    --
    Tom
    NACRA 5.7 (1984 Sail 181)
    Pennsylvania
    --
  • I can't raise my sail and especially can't hook my ring aloft unless i am directly into the wind
    same for dropping the main
  • rungiWhat is the best way to raise and lower the sail while it is windy on a 5.7

    The boat itself is a sail even with no sails up.
    You can sail to some extent with no sails.
    Even in light winds raising the main sail is not easy for me. The boat begins to sail. As soon as the hulls catch wind
    Are there any techniques to get the main up in windy condition.
    I am surprised how fast this boat with go with just the furling jib which is easy to open even in strong winds.


    A couple of things that may help with the raising effort: Some people roll the sail bottom to top. This can allow you to have the sail rolled while you raise it. Also, spray the sail track with a dry silicone (I use McLube). On the sail luff, more than likely your sail has a bunch of wrinkles along the front edge of the mainsail (the part that slides in the mast). Look at the very bottom of the bolt rope. There should be some stitching cross wise that is holding the interior bolt rope inside the luff tape. Cut this stitching loose. The bolt rope will suck inside the luff tape probably 4-6". This will help minimize the luff wrinkles and make it easier to raise and lower the sail. Of course, new sails make raising much easier. I have a lubricated luff tape and it can be done with one hand. Lastly, make sure the main halyard rounds a turning block to be pull fore and aft instead of down. This was a huge difference when I converted mine.

    --
    Scott

    Prindle 18-2 Mod "FrankenKitty"
    Tornado Classic "Fast Furniture"
    Prindle 19 "Mr. Wiggly" - gone
    Nacra 5.8 "De ja vu"
    Nacra 5.0
    Nacra 5.8
    Tornadoes (Reg White)
    --

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