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Need help comparing a Hobie Getaway and Prindle 18-2 ease in raising a mast  Bottom

  • Seems the Getaway has no boom and the mast may be lighter in any case. Any other pros or cons of these two welcome. I know the Prindle is likely faster; not sure which is easier to sail. Both will have wings.
  • A Getaway is a recreational boat
    A Prindle 18./2 is a performance boat
    Big difference
  • don't you have a prindlle 18-2?

    Quote
    ragebot post Posted: Aug 20, 2019 - 09:59 AM
    Got a Prindle 18 2. Seems to be in fairly good shape,


    https://www.thebeachcats.…nc=viewtopic&topic=17867

    haven't we had this discussion?

    you know the 18-2
    the getaway is rotomold - less performance but also easier to rig, right, sail (less control lines), etc
  • MN3don't you have a prindlle 18-2?

    Quote
    ragebot post Posted: Aug 20, 2019 - 09:59 AM
    Got a Prindle 18 2. Seems to be in fairly good shape,


    https://www.thebeachcats.…nc=viewtopic&topic=17867

    haven't we had this discussion?

    you know the 18-2
    the getaway is rotomold - less performance but also easier to rig, right, sail (less control lines), etc


    I am still learning and every discussion helps. The peeps who know me call me "chicken of the sea" and so far I have never needed to right any boat.

    I understand what I am calling the general idea that the 18-2 is faster and harder to rig, sail, and take apart than a Getaway. What I am trying to figure out is how much easier the Getaway (or similar boats) are to get on the water. I will not be doing any racing and only taking the boat out in light air (I do understand about pop up storms) for day sailing, or weekend camping.

    My problem is I have never been able to raise the mast on my 18-2 without help and it takes more time than I am happy with. While I still have visions of doing the Everglades Challenge in the 18-2 what I am considering is an easy to get on the water boat for quick afternoon sails.
  • QuoteWhat I am trying to figure out is how much easier the Getaway (or similar boats) are to get on the water.

    A lot!
    call around for a rental and go kill it in 15knots
    then buy one - you will sail a lot more, and can decide if you want to keep the 18-2 is stronger than your need to keep it.

    Did you get out on your big cruiser in the past year?
  • QuoteMy problem is I have never been able to raise the mast on my 18-2 without help and ...

    you are not applying physics in the correct spots.

    there is always a way ...
    Gin Pole
    or
    have you turned your cat 180 on the trailer ? if you do the mast yoke can act as a head start on stepping
    you could even roll your bows off the trailer (bows in the sand, sterns in the air) this way and your mast would be 70% stepped

    but with a mini olympic race catamaran it will be labor intense
    same with my cat - plus i have wings (no spin rigged currently)

    I sailed last weekend:
    30 min remove cover, roll out, pre drive inspection
    60 min of on the beach to lower wings, prep and step - rig and roll
    70 on the get ready for drive home (wings take extra time to put up / down is faster)


    Quoteit takes more time than I am happy with


    Hobie Rotomolds are much faster to step, rig, get on the water
    if you are not racing or in a fleet of other cats who cares if you are going a little slower?
  • MN3
    QuoteWhat I am trying to figure out is how much easier the Getaway (or similar boats) are to get on the water.

    A lot!
    call around for a rental and go kill it in 15knots
    then buy one - you will sail a lot more, and can decide if you want to keep the 18-2 is stronger than your need to keep it.

    Did you get out on your big cruiser in the past year?


    Thx for posting this, just the type of information I was looking for. Your next posts really answered a lot of my questions as well. I am in the process of fabricating a gin pole and accessories to keep the mast stable as I raise it with my come along. I am definitely keeping the 18-2 as I still have a fantasy of doing the EC.

    This has been a hard year with COVID-19 messing up my cruising plans (not to mention messing up a lot of things for a lot of peeps). No real way to go to the Bahamas or Cuba so only some weekend sails to barrier islands in the Florida Big Bend. While I am very happy with the marina where the Seawind is since it is on a cool, clear, spring fed river well inland and a great hurricane hole it is also a couple of hours to the last red marker and open water so I don't go out as much as I like.
  • QuoteMy problem is I have never been able to raise the mast on my 18-2 without help and it takes more time than I am happy with.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=By4RZe84RWs
    Strapping trap wires to the trailer crossbar under the front beam worked great for me. Pulling with the jib sheet with 2:1 purchase makes it even easier and safer, but if you prefer to skip that part it may be done faster. I like to be able to secure the mast before stepping down to attach the forestay, so that’s a big reason to use the jib sheet too. I think it’s risky to step down securing the mast with a line on your hand. But bottom line, stabilizing the mast side to side makes a huge difference, it’s still heavy but way more manageable. Not sure if the Getaway mast is much lighter to allow stepping it without any additional system, but still I don’t think it’s a big difference on rigging time. Other things are though.



    Edited by Andinista on May 20, 2021 - 09:50 AM.
  • The lack of diamond wires on the Getaway should make a huge difference in being able to step the mast. With diamond wires you have to change your grip to step the mast. With either boat I would recommend either having the boat on the trailer backwards so the mast will be supported by the trailer yoke or put an A frame ladder behind your boat if you don't want it on the trailer backwards. Having the mast already raised a few feet makes all the difference. Run a line from the jib halyard or the forestay through the bridle and back to where you'll be standing after you walk the mast up. If it's still too much, get an extension for the mast yoke so the mast will be high enough to shoulder when you start out.

    --
    Bill Townsend
    G-Cat 5.7
    Sarasota
    --
  • shortyfoxThe lack of diamond wires on the Getaway should make a huge difference in being able to step the mast. With diamond wires you have to change your grip to step the mast. With either boat I would recommend either having the boat on the trailer backwards so the mast will be supported by the trailer yoke or put an A frame ladder behind your boat if you don't want it on the trailer backwards. Having the mast already raised a few feet makes all the difference. Run a line from the jib halyard or the forestay through the bridle and back to where you'll be standing after you walk the mast up. If it's still too much, get an extension for the mast yoke so the mast will be high enough to shoulder when you start out.


    I do have a 12 foot step ladder I have used raising the mast. I have also seen a support attached to the rear crossbar about three feet high to secure the mast once you have used the step ladder for the initial raise and am thinking about making one of those.

    Great point about the diamond wires.
  • the getaway has a 25' stick too. that should help

    I gin pole is the most fool proof way but doubles rigging time

    as mentioned several times:

    If you are not using a gin pole i would definitely recommend turning the cat around on the trailer and use the mast yoke as your "cheater"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEHWujFuDsQ
  • ragebotGreat point about the diamond wires.

    I think on the 18.2 you don’t need to rotate the mast 90 deg on its axis when horizontal, as on the Nacras, so the diamond wires shouldn’t bother as much.

    MN3the getaway has a 25' stick too. that should help

    I gin pole is the most fool proof way but doubles rigging time

    as mentioned several times:

    If you are not using a gin pole i would definitely recommend turning the cat around on the trailer and use the mast yoke as your "cheater"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEHWujFuDsQ

    One comment on that video: the bows of that cat are tilted slightly up, so the rear beam is slightly lower than the front beam. When that happens it’s harder to raise the mast because you start pushing it with the hands on a lower position. Small differences make a big effect. If the car and trailer were moved back a couple meters, the angle of the beach would have tilted the bows down and made things easier.



    Edited by Andinista on May 22, 2021 - 04:51 PM.

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