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SUP paddle used as a righting pole  Bottom

  • I was wondering if anyone used a SUP paddle as a righting pole?

    Maybe if could be stored under the tramp, from striker to rear cross bar. If the blade had a notch in the middle and bottom, it coukd fit over the striker rod. Notch about 12 mm wide and 25 mm deep. Wouldnt affect paddle to much. During righting, it could be connected to striker by a second wider notch about 2 inches wide and 1/4 inch deep. Tied at notch end. Two 6 or 7 coot lines at handle end, one to bridle on upper hull, the other to rear cross bar. The key is to pick a shaft and blaxe that are stiff enough to handle me hanging of it. The blaxe would need to be loaded axially and not bent. Maybe a better way is to have handle at bkat, and blade in air. It woukd need a custom fitting or line to secure it.

    I have seen righting poles from center of boat too. Better leverage but trickier connection.

    Thoughts?

    --
    John

    Marstrom Tornado
    Nacra 5.0

    CT
    --
  • So your paddle is strong enough to stand on?I have a righting board that is tied under my cat with bungees. 8 ft long piece of 2x6 cedar It is light and strong I am 225lbs cut a little angle so it fit in my dagger well a line for the front and back. Depending on your size you could use a 2x4 I had a cat set up with 1x6 works for evryone but me too much flex .The problem with a paddle is your footing area is so small the strength is another issue.I would not go out without a righting board and we have outfitted all our cats with a righting board and train people how to use them mandatory at our club now.
    I sail a nacra 5.2 love it
  • I havent used a righting board so not sure of how to operate it. If standing on it is required, i may need to custom make a beefy paddle.

    --
    John

    Marstrom Tornado
    Nacra 5.0

    CT
    --
  • If it is strong enough, you could fashion some lines on it and it may work. I put some money into my system, purchasing a 5 ft carbon fiber tube, then mounting a nylon cutting board to one end to use as a paddle. I don't have any good photos of it handy, but you can see it mounted to the boom in this photo. There is a reflective section of aluminum plate at the end (cut from a road sign I found in a ditch). This slides into the daggerboard well which will be clear later in this post.

    http://www.catsail.com/crap/pj-on-beach.jpg

    I've righted the Prindle 19 once with this pole, which is the Solo~Right design pioneered by Gary Friesen years ago, and demonstrated below. Remarkably, over 20 years ago:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCbihZsXESg

    Note the part that slides into the daggerboard well. That is the aluminum plate I mentioned ealier. My pole only has one set of lines due to it's strength, but note the two sets of lines in the video that may work with your paddle.



    Edited by mattson on Mar 24, 2020 - 10:08 AM.

    --
    Bill Mattson
    Prindle 19 "Gelli Bean"
    Prindle 19 "Cat's Pajamas"
    --
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKuSSZ7JxBA

    https://www.thebeachcats.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=132325&g2_serialNumber=4&g2_GALLERYSID=6efb65b1dd0698fd79eb85aab823cd27

    Here is mine. Today it's shorter than in the video. It's an old windsurf carbon mast, I woudln't advice aluminum tube, I broke one long ago.
    If you don't have daggerboards I can imagine an attachment at the front beam. Perhaps the line should be attached at the bridle connections.

    The drawing is a bit confusing, the idea is:
    At the outside end of the pole there is a shackle (attached to a line around the pole, passing through an eystrap on the pole). This shackle will attach to a loop knot on the rope, there are two of them, one for each side.
    When stored, the excess of line is wrapped manually at the back of the pole under the tramp. Through the cords that tension the tramp. The yellow line is a bungee with a hook, to secure the system. Another bungee with hook secures the pole at the front.
  • Quotehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCbihZsXESg

    Note the part that slides into the daggerboard well. That is the aluminum plate I mentioned ealier. My pole only has one set of lines due to it's strength, but note the two sets of lines in the video that may work with your paddle.

    +1
    I was looking for that.

    here is another vid of a guy who has a similar:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTRS5pTZGV4

    Not sure how he flipped in his yard but at least he stayed dry



    Edited by MN3 on Mar 24, 2020 - 12:13 PM.
  • +1 on the wind surfer mast- that's what I have. Highly doubt the SUP paddle will make it, at least the ones I see around here.

    --
    Chuck C.
    H21SE 408
    --
  • Murreys used to have one in their catalogue. If I remember correctly it was a Rick White design. I don't remember it being too expensive.

    --
    Bill Townsend
    G-Cat 5.7
    Sarasota
    --
  • A SUP paddle is built to be light, & does not see anywhere near the forces a righting pole would. I made one out of AL tube quite a bit heavier than a paddle, & it broke.
    You cannot drill holes through the shaft for support lines, they create a weak point.
    You would need sleeve(s). One set of support lines was not enough for the one I made. Two sets might have worked, but it makes rigging complicated. The lines have to be exact, so that each one takes 1/4 of the load.
    Also, as stated, it is extremely difficult to balance on a pole. You have to rig it on angle, 45ish, so you can hang from the end. Of course it has to be long enough to give enough leverage when on an angle, & you have to be able to get out of the way as the hull comes down on top of you.
    Bills idea of something that slides into the trunk works, I’ve seen it on an H18.
    I gave up on the pole method, the bag with 3:1 purchase works well.

    --
    Hobie 18 Magnum
    Dart 15
    Mystere 6.0XL Sold Was a handful solo
    Nacra 5.7
    Nacra 5.0
    Bombardier Invitation (Now officially DEAD)
    Various other Dock cluttering WaterCrap
    --
  • My cedar righting board 2x6 x 8 ft long notch it 6 inches from the top and tie your line here I think about 15 ft long. Add
    quick couplers or carribiners to the end of your lines cut the other end of the board at approx a 45 angle .On a hobie 16 the angle fits nicely into the deck lip and on my nacra 5.2 the angle fits the dagger well the board sits at about 45 degree angle so you adjust your lines till you have it set right.In the water undo it from your cat [tied with bungees] throw one line over the back hull clip to itself repeat on the front then stand up board in well or deck lip you can sit on it or stand the further out you go the easier it is to right your cat.Even the most lightweight of sailors can right a cat using a righting board
    Good luck
  • Edchris177A SUP paddle is built to be light, & does not see anywhere near the forces a righting pole would. I made one out of AL tube quite a bit heavier than a paddle, & it broke.
    You cannot drill holes through the shaft for support lines, they create a weak point.
    You would need sleeve(s). One set of support lines was not enough for the one I made. Two sets might have worked, but it makes rigging complicated. The lines have to be exact, so that each one takes 1/4 of the load.
    Also, as stated, it is extremely difficult to balance on a pole. You have to rig it on angle, 45ish, so you can hang from the end. Of course it has to be long enough to give enough leverage when on an angle, & you have to be able to get out of the way as the hull comes down on top of you.
    Bills idea of something that slides into the trunk works, I’ve seen it on an H18.
    I gave up on the pole method, the bag with 3:1 purchase works well.


    Agree on the paddle probably not strong enough, and the extra lines does make things complex. On the balancing, see the video I posted. A righting line rigged fore and aft works very well to maintain balance. I righted the P19 in waves with this system and balance was not difficult, even for this old man.

    One thing to mention about my system is that it is not built for speed. It takes a while to set up and break down. But I find it very easy to use once rigged. I do a lot of solo sailing on that boat (obviously ONLY solo sailing at this point in time), and needed to make sure I could right it alone. I know people who sail their boats on salt water with no idea on whether they can right them. Does not seem prudent, IMHO. Also, the confidence in being able to right the boat allows you to push it harder. Given the time to rig though, I sail more conservatively when first going out or coming in to the harbor as I am closer to the surf line,

    --
    Bill Mattson
    Prindle 19 "Gelli Bean"
    Prindle 19 "Cat's Pajamas"
    --
  • I have to ask again, have you checked Murrays? Their "power righting system" is a pole that folds under the tramp with support lines and hardware and looks well thought out. Even if $300 is too much it is described in some detail and could give you ideas on building your own.

    --
    Bill Townsend
    G-Cat 5.7
    Sarasota
    --

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