Cheers from WA - new Hobie 21SC owner

Hello all, after years of sailing absence (I think about 18?), I bought recently bought Hobie 21SC.
I have the itch to get back on the water.

Boat is in good shape minus paint issues and front tramp.
Prev. owner regularly added some ablative anti-fouling but first owner added some hard antifouling coat, which is brittle and coming off over time, taking the newer coats with it. Plan is to go back to gel-coat, Have to see what stripper / method works best and leaves the gel-coat intact. Suggestions here are very welcome.

Front tramp: Prev. owner placed a solid vinyl tarp on top of the old, raggedy net-tramp. Now the stitching came undone / ripped. I guess the yarn chosen was not overly UV resistant. I hope to find a way to reuse the mounting outline of the original tramp, or have a new one made.
Maybe... I'd even attempt to make my own. I've welded vinyl tarp before but do not have equipment for sewing.

Trailer just got some new lights and grommets - still have to wire a few things up.
Front supports are big Murray cradles, rear old dual rollers. The 21SC is heavy and I hope to come up with a solution that adds better support in the rear. Also want to add a better stop in the front the cross-beam can be pulled up against (maybe a T with two stoppers).

Oh, and I have to work on winterizing the cat and part properly.
At least the mast is down and sails & rudders are washed and inside already. icon_biggrin



Edited by diewurst on Oct 11, 2019 - 02:17 PM.
Congratulations ! Is this the one that was for sale in sequim? Where will you be launching from?

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Dart 20
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Indeed, it was.

The boat will be located in Warm Beach, WA but I also plan to explore some other waters after making the trailer a bit more boat friendly.

Photo location should look familiar to you.

https://i.imgur.com/DJIlGZ7.jpg?2
https://i.imgur.com/DJIlGZ7.jpg?2[/quote]
Nice looking boat
i would suggest you do not travel with your rudders down

i would suggest you remove them completely unless you are driving a very short distance on paved roads with no bumps
QuoteFront supports are big Murray cradles, rear old dual rollers. The 21SC is heavy and I hope to come up with a solution that adds better support in the rear.

double rollers are fantastic for beach cats
they spread the load out and are a good choice for locations that have snow

last comment: anti foul on a beach cat? why? these boats are not meant to be mored or stored in the water... no need for that stuff
I agree on the rudders. I trusted the prev. owner who towed it like that with no issue and had brief road contact, entering the driveway at home. It buffed out, lesson learned, Cpt hindsight was right.

Quotelast comment: anti foul on a beach cat? why? these boats are not meant to be mored or stored in the water... no need for that stuff


Prev. owner had it moored in the summers and lived only a few miles away from it.
Same with mine - the previous guy had copper anti-fouling on it. I'm also interested in what takes the stuff off easiest. I'm guessing sanding, but would rather not sand as much as possible to preserve the thickness of the fiberglass. Don't think I, personally have a choice. Since I've had a very successful 1st season, my 21 is getting new paint this winter.

I've purchased a bunch of galvanized steel to weld up stops, just like mentioned to pull the boat up to. They will use rubber, keel vee-stops and I'm going to connect the two with a cross bar that will hold a permanently mounted gin pole. The stops will have eye bolts as well, in line with the pivot point of the mast ball so I can attach the trap lines for stabilization of the mast as I raise the mast with the winch. Sounds complicated, but should have 90%+ done by Monday - it should be easy. I'll post pics.

BTW - I re-sewed my tramp with a home sewing machine (Janome). Worked great - just used dual-duty polyester thread. The original thread had completely rotted away. But, it'll need to be redone with proper V-92 thread I'm sure. Still, it worked and is holding up fine now. Sailrite has some pretty good vid's on how to do this for a new tramp, if you're inclined. I then added a couple of custom pockets for halyard, water bottles/other stuff. Handy. Good luck! You'll love these boats.

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Chuck C.
H21SE 408
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Chuck, thanks for tossing all the specifics in the the post - that fills in blanks and does come in handy!

This is what I came across - pretty similar to what you are describing.

https://www.boattrailerpa…wc-bow-stop-assy-wo8412/

https://www.boattrailerpartsplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/WO8412-ASSY-500x559.jpg
I used citristrip on a previous boat. Found putting it on late evening gave it all night to work without drying out. Blasted it off with a pressure washer next morning. Only problem was the paint comes off in pieces which stuck to the nearby shrubbery. Didn't harm the gelcoat at all.
That's virtually what I'm building, except the cross piece will be 5 feet, with welded eye bolts at either end to attach bridle and gin pole lines to, in order to make a permanently mounted gin pole on the trailer that pivots at same height and in-line with mast. So far so good, except that half way through welding up the hinge to a mounting plate I discovered I was using stainless wire filler...doh! Wondered why it was spitting so much and couldn't get a decent weld puddle to save my life. Weird thing is, it held... I'll finish with normal steel on the other angles.

Pictures coming. later this week.

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Chuck C.
H21SE 408
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charlescarlisBTW - I re-sewed my tramp with a home sewing machine (Janome). Worked great - just used dual-duty polyester thread. The original thread had completely rotted away. But, it'll need to be redone with proper V-92 thread I'm sure.

You'll get a season or two from the poly thread if you religiously keep it covered, and maybe a few more when you upgrade to V-92. That is a lot of work, and you are cutting fibers in the tramp every time you sew. Consider biting the bullet and using Tenara thread which will last a decade in the sun. The manufacturer gives it a lifetime guarantee.

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Sheet In!
Bob
_/)_____/)_/)____/)____/)_____/)/)__________/)__
Prindle 18-2 #244 "Wakizashi"
Prindle 16 #3690 "Pegasus" Sold (sigh)
AZ Multihull Fleet 42 member
(Way) Past Commodore of Prindle Fleet 14
Arizona, USA
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Yeah, I hear you, but on a 5-10yr. Old tramp (about), its hard to justify buying $120 worth of thread at the moment. New tramp build? Absolutely. That'll come in, oh about 2 years, so...cheap it is! Ill likely have some good thread by then as I'm slowly building up sail/canvas tools and supplies.

Thanks for the tip, though. Thought the V-92 would've lasted longer. Huh, good to know.

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Chuck C.
H21SE 408
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Go on line and check out Sunrise Yacht Products out of St. Pete for tramps. Great quality and great prices.

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Bill Townsend
G-Cat 5.7
Sarasota
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shortyfoxGo on line and check out Sunrise Yacht Products out of St. Pete for tramps. Great quality and great prices.

they are far from the cheapest on the market but they are probably the highest quality
the h21 costs $457.14 (for the better thread) and has a 5 year Warranty
the cheaper thread is about $60 less with a 2 year Warranty

i have used them exclusively in my 20 years of beach cat sailing (i tried slo but they failed to do the job)

https://multihullnets.com…ils.aspx?PartNumber=H-21
Looks like they make decent products - but all they offer is mesh.
In cold WA waters, I am looking to go with tarp(aulin) in the front as well to keep me & the crew a bit drier.
It looks like SLO Sail and Canvas mades a nice vinyl tramp for $400 for the upgrade thread in four different colors.

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Bill 404 21SE
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diewurstLooks like they make decent products - but all they offer is mesh.
In cold WA waters, I am looking to go with tarp(aulin) in the front as well to keep me & the crew a bit drier.

2 issues with the non mesh tramps are:
1 - they hold water so you are sitting in a puddle
2 - slightly more windage which can be a big issue in a capsize

ymmv
MN3
diewurstLooks like they make decent products - but all they offer is mesh.
In cold WA waters, I am looking to go with tarp(aulin) in the front as well to keep me & the crew a bit drier.

2 issues with the non mesh tramps are:
1 - they hold water so you are sitting in a puddle
2 - slightly more windage which can be a big issue in a capsize

ymmv



Get the best Goretex drysuit you can find. Even on the warmest days water temperatures in the salish sea hover around 50° and you're going to get wet regardless of tramp material. Staying warm and dry is the difference between enjoying your capsize or having a near death experience.
Slo made a custom tramp for my dart 20 that was $200 less than the stock tramp from anywhere else, I'm very happy with it.
It's a mesh tramp, I agree with MN3 on the reasons



Edited by boatbore on Oct 21, 2019 - 03:09 PM.

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Dart 20
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QuoteGet the best Goretex drysuit you can find.

+1



SLO
"Our products are warranted against defects due to workmanship or material flaws for 1 year. "

"Sunrise Yacht Products will repair to the customer's satisfaction or replace at no charge any Net or Trampoline, which fails under normal use within the first year. Nets or Trampolines failing under normal use in succeeding years of the warranty period will, at our discretion, be repaired at no charge, or given a pro-rated credit toward the purchase of a replacement. "

I have owned at least 5 tramps from Sunrise - never have i needed any warranty work
I have had them restitch old tramps

get what ya payed for
Whatever trampoline you get make sure you get the correct boat. Confusion between the 21SE and 21SC is common and the trampolines are very different. Make sure you get the correct one, likely made to order and hard to return. Enjoy your new boat.

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Scott,
‘92 H18 w/SX wings
‘95 Hobie Funseeker 12 (Holder 12)
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boatboreGet the best Goretex drysuit you can find. Even on the warmest days water temperatures in the salish sea hover around 50° and you're going to get wet regardless of tramp material. Staying warm and dry is the difference between enjoying your capsize or having a near death experience.

Another vote for good gear. I'm a big fan of NRS gear. Goretex is good stuff, but some of their other fabrics work well if you can't/won't afford Goretex.

There aren't that many SCs out there -- enjoy the heck outta yours!

Randii
I like how goretex doesn't hold in your body moisture. It cost more and probably has a shorter life but makes long days in your suit much more pleasant.
My first drysuit was fondly referred to as my "poor man's drysuit". It's rather sketchy and needs to be used with great caution but it served me for many years, it consisted of chest waders $80, a semi drytop $70 with a good tight fitting pdf on top. If I went into the water for any length of time i might get a cup or two of water inside but that was somewhat refreshing when overheating from working to right the boat.
The sport cruiser looks good for this area, great camping boat, enjoy!

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Dart 20
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QuoteI like how goretex doesn't hold in your body moisture. It cost more and probably has a shorter life but makes long days in your suit much more pleasant.

+1

My non gortex Kokatat farmer john's are great but gets swampy pretty easily with all the movement we do sailing
I really don't sail in cold water, and don't sail in under 70* and sunny these days but if i ever get another, it will be goretex
Valid comments but too late icon_biggrin
I found a "poor man's" drysuit. It's a used (like new) low-end NRS. New price for these was $450-500.

Reviews complain about bad fitment (potato sack) and yea, it's not breathable material (coated Nylon I believe).
But hey, it was under $100 shipped and being ~6.3 I stretch out the sack pretty good. Also have to make sure to remove excess air after putting it on. Tried it on at home, instant tropical sauna inside. Was wearing it for ~3hrs in 50deg weather and it was fine. Good enough starter suit.

Wearing it and then stuffing the air compressor hose into a cuff is fun!